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Tuesday the 30th of June, 2009
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WORTH-2

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Good morning. I hope you like our "new look".

Today we continue our look at expressions with the adjective worth.

Today's 1st expression is: for all somebody is worth

Meaning: with a lot of effort, energy and determination.

Example 1:
He is studying for all he is worth. He really wants to pass that exam.

Today's 2nd expression is: for what it is worth

Meaning: used to emphasize that what you are saying is only your own opinion or suggestion and may not be very helpful.

Example 2:
My idea, for what it's worth, is to finish this project before we start the next one.

Good-bye.


Monday the 29th of June, 2009
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WORTH-1

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Good morning. I hope everyone had a nice weekend.

This week we are going to look at some common meanings and uses of the English word worth.

Worth can be an adjective with the meaning "having a value in money, etc." As an adjective it is usually preceded by the verb BE.

Example 1:
Their flat is worth about 850,000 euros.

Worth can also be a noun with the meaning "amount" or "value."

Example 2:
The winner will receive 100 euros worth of books.

The most interesting uses of worth are in expressions (usually with worth as an ajective). This week we will learn some of them.

In November 2003, we saw the following expression with worth as a noun:

to get your money's worth.

Meaning: to feel that something you have received is worth the amount that you paid for it.

Example 3:
I only paid 8,000 euros for this car 10 years ago and it is still running perfectly. I really feel like I got my money's worth when I bought it.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Good-bye until tomorrow.



Friday the 26th of June, 2009
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GET-2

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Good morning.

La semana pasada vimos algunos usos del verbo GET en inglés para indicar un cambio de estado: "convertirse en..." o "empezar a..." (to get drunk, to get dirty, etc.).

Hoy miramos otro uso común con el verbo GET; esta vez para contestar cuando alguien llama a la puerta o para contestar el teléfono.

Si estás en casa y suena el teléfono, no solemos decir "I'll answer it" (lo contestaré) sino "I'll get it" (lo cogeré). Algo parecido pasa cuando alguien llama a la puerta. Para indicar que nuestra intención es abrir la puerta, para que todos en casa lo sepan, normalmente decimos "I'll get it" y no "I'll answer it."

Decir "I'll get it" es una manera de avisar a los demás que están en casa que estás en camino a abrir la puerta. Para la misma situación podríamos decir "ya voy" en castellano. Cuando suena el teléfono podemos decir "ya lo cojo". "I'll get it" funciona en las dos situaciones en inglés. 

Si tienes preguntas sobre el contenido de esta Essential Weekly Vitamin, por favor usa el foro en la sección Daily Vitamin Plus! en nuestra página web.

I hope you have a good day and a great weekend!



Thursday the 25th of June, 2009
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MAKE UP YOUR MIND (REVISION)

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Good morning and welcome to all of you who are new to the Daily Vitamin!

Today we review a Daily Vitamin originally sent in November of 2003.

Today's expression is: To make up your mind

It means: To make a definite decision.

Example 1:
I've finally made up my mind; I'm going to accept the new job.

Example 2:
My husband can never make up his mind. Yesterday he said he wanted to go to Greece for the summer holidays and now he says he wants to go to Egypt. 

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Have a good day!


Tuesday the 23rd of June, 2009
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LAST vs LATEST

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Good morning.

Today we are going to explain the difference between the two adjectives last and latest, which are often confused. This is a review of a Daily Vitamin that we sent in November of 2005.

Both last and latest are translated into Spanish as último, but they have different meanings in English, which is what causes the confusion.

LAST: refers to something or someone that happens or comes at the end or after all other things or people.

Example 1:
We caught the last train home.

Example 2:
Come on, Ricky! You're always the last one to arrive!

LATEST: refers to the newest or most recent thing or person. It insinuates that there will be more in the future.

Example 3:
Tina is the latest person to be hired in the accounting department. However, I'm sure she won't be the last.

Example 4:
Gina is so cool. She's always dressed in the latest fashions.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin, please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website (www.ziggurat.es).

Enjoy the rest of your day!