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Friday the 28th of September, 2007
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OUT OF ORDER (1)

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning everyone.

Today we are going to answer another question from a Daily Vitamin Plus! user:

Hello Matthew!
I have an urgent question for you. At this moment our clients use headphones during our bus tour. When there is a technical problem with the connexion point we need to attach an adhesive sign telling them that it is not working. Is it possible to use "Damaged" or would it be better to use "Out of order" or "Not working"? I'm a bit confused. THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!
Mònica G.


Today's Expression is: OUT OF ORDER

It means: not working correctly (when referring to machines)

Example 1:
He went to buy a coke during the break, but the snack machine had an out-of-order sign on it, so he had to go down to the bar to get one.

Example 2:
Janet: I'm enjoying this bus tour a lot.
Mark: Of course you are...you have headphones. Mine are out of order. Can I borrow yours for the rest of the tour?

Out of Order is also used in other contexts, and Monday we will look at some more uses.

So, Mónica, although your options damaged and not working are perfectly correct, there is a tendency to use the more formal out of order for signs on equipment or machines in public places to indicate that they are not working.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website. Thanks for your question Mónica.

Enjoy your day and have a great weekend!



Thursday the 27th of September, 2007
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'CONSTIPADO' IN ENGLISH

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Good morning.

I had originally said that yesterday was going to be the last day we talked about being ill in English. However, the other day we received the following comment from one of our Daily Vitamin users:

No confundir "Estoy constipado" con "I am constipated", jejejeje (Mireia Vancells)

A couple of days later, we received this comment from Sebastián:

As you live in Spain, maybe you know the BIG problem the Spaniards have with the word "CONSTIPATION" in English. This is  ... they have a cold, ... but say "I am constipated" .... which in fact is (as I'm sure you know) "estreñido."

I thought it would be worth sharing this comment with all of you, since this false friend can cause some serious miscommunication problems.

SPANISH --> ESTREÑIDO
ENGLISH --> CONSTIPATED

SPANISH --> CONSTIPADO
ENGLISH --> CONGESTED (STUFFED-UP NOSE)

Generally, you may comment, in public with friends and colleagues, about having a cold, being congested or having a stuffed-up nose. However, it's not very common to inform people that you are constipated (estreñido).

Enjoy the rest of your day, and be sure to eat lots of fibre. ;-)

Regards,



Wednesday the 26th of September, 2007
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'PUENTE' IN ENGLISH (REVIEW)

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Good morning.

The other day we received the following question:

How do you say in English: el proximo fin de semana es puente? (Montse Paredes)

This week we didn't send the Daily Vitamin on Monday because it was a bank holiday in Barcelona (La Mercè).

In Spanish, when referring to a weekend like last weekend, with one or more bank holidays next to it, it is very common to talk about "puentes," or even "acueductos." In English, however, we do NOT use the equivalent words "bridges" or "aqueducts" to describe weekends that are formed by combining bank holidays with "unofficial" days off. There is no equivalent in English. We generally just call it a long weekend

Therefore, Montse, to say el proximo fin de semana es puente? we would probably simply say "next weekend is a long weekend."

Please post any questions about today's Daily Vitamin in the Daily Vitamin section on our website.

Regards, 



Tuesday the 25th of September, 2007
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BEING ILL-4 (REVIEW)

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Good morning. I hope you had a good weekend.

To finish the topic of being ill, I want to concentrate on the noun ache and how it combines with other nouns to talk about pain:

-To have an earache
-To have a toothache
-To have a stomach-ache
-To have a headache

Ache means "dolor" and is pronounced "eik." It combines with certain parts of the body to create a separate noun, as in the above expressions.

Example 1
I lifted those heavy boxes and now my back hurts. I have a backache.

Example 2
My tooth hurts because I have a cavity ('caries'). I have a toothache.

Example 3
My stomach hurts because I have the flu ('gripe'). I have a stomach-ache.

Example 4
My ear hurts because I have an ear infection. I have an earache.

Example 5
My head hurts. It's the worst headache I have had in a long time.

Ache cannot combine with every part of the body, only the ones covered above. You can say "my finger hurts" or "I hurt my finger" but you CANNOT say that you have a **fingerache**.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website.

Have a good day and a great week!



Friday the 21st of September, 2007
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BEING ILL-3 (REVIEW)

LISTEN TO THE DAILY VITAMIN HERE:

Good morning everybody.

Today we will continue with expressions related to being ill. So far we have looked at the following words and expressions:

-To not be feeling well (I'm not feeling well)
-To be ill / to be sick (He's ill.)
-To have a cold (Janet has a cold.)
-To have a fever (Rachel has a very high fever.)
-Head hurts (My head hurts.)
-I'm congested or I have a stuffed-up nose
-General aches and pains

Yesterday we also looked at the difference between ill and sick.

Today we will review phrases that we can use to let people know we want them to get better, such as:

Get well soon!

I hope you feel better soon!

OR

I hope you get better soon!

You may also give ill people suggestions of things they can do to help alleviate their suffering, such as:

Get lots of rest.

OR

Drink lots of liquids

However, if you're like me you may prefer not to tell ill people what they should do. ;-)

Monday is a holiday in Barcelona (La Mercè), so there will be no Daily Vitamin. Tuesday will be the last day that we will look at expressions related to being ill.

If you have any questions about today's Daily Vitamin please post them in the Daily Vitamin Plus! forum section on our website.

Have a great day and an excellent weekend!